Illinois Professor Recounts Appearance At UN Climate Summit

University of Illinois Professor Stephen Long spoke at the United Nations Climate Summit in Paris about the need to improve agricultural productivity.

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Illinois and Syngenta Sign Agreement for Access to RIPE Intellectual Property

Syngenta will serve as a commercialization partner by providing research materials and facilities to support RIPE project goals, as well as bring the industry perspective for bridging key, fundamental photosynthetic research to commercial product development.

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Doug Orr: Enzyme Hunter

“We’re deliberately looking at a very diverse range of plants, and we aim to look at a few forests' worth of different plant species in our search for a better Rubisco.”

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RIPE Director to Speak at Paris Climate Convention

Agricultural innovation is needed now—not later—to avoid food shortages in a world with an ever-changing climate and a growing population.

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Amanda de Souza: Engineering hope for millions

Amanda de Souza cradles a plastic petri dish in her hands. Tiny plants press against the lid; their roots form a delicate web. It’s hard to imagine that hope for millions of people may lie inside something so small, so seemingly fragile.

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Australia’s remarkable female scientists highlighted in new exhibition in Canberra

The careers of 40 female Australian scientists are being featured in a new exhibition as part of National Science Week in Canberra.The League of Remarkable Women in Australian Science shares the stories of how the women entered their research fields and the hurdles they faced along the way.

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Gizmodo: The Plan to Feed the World by Hacking Photosynthesis

With the world population projected to soar past the 11 billion mark by 2100, we’re going to need to find some creative new ways of putting food on the table. The latest science-powered plan to feed the world? Hacking photosynthesis.

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Boosting Photosynthesis to Feed the World

In the half-century or so leading up to 2005, food production around the world grew by 160 percent. In the next 50 years, the human population and global affluence—both major drivers of agricultural demand—are only expected to increase; researchers estimate that food production will need to grow by 60 to 120 percent by mid-century to keep pace. Luckily, a few scientists might have an answer: In a perspective published today in PNAS, researchers present several ways that photosynthesis could be re-designed to meet agricultural demands.

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Lighter colored upper leaves may be crop ‘photosynthesis hack’

Researchers are determining ways to boost crop production through expanding benefits of photosynthesis and understanding how plants react with light

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Researchers Bring New Life to Campus Greenhouse

Situated next to the University of Illinois’s Plant Core Facility on Dorner Drive, a once state-of-the-art controlled environment greenhouse and laboratory sat unused until now.

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