ARC

Crop genetic benefit two fold thanks to algae

Alge has long been known to be one of natures greatest carbon sinks, with some estimates being as high as 25% of carbon being captured into the biosphere by micro-organisms. Now researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants.

By: Cameron Costigan | Into the Void Science

Researchers hold tobacco plants next to growth chambers.

Algae could be crucial to boosting crop yields

Scientists have made the break through, into the way plants convert carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight into energy.

By: Eddie Summerfield | 2GB 873 AM

This Week in Science teaser image of the hosts.

This Week in Science Podcast

Australian scientists have managed to combine a CO2-eating carboxysome from blue-green algae with the cells of crop plants in the hopes that yields will eventually increase some 60%.

By: Kirsten Sanford | This Week in Science Podcast

carboxysome cover art

Carboxysome encapsulation of the CO2-fixingenzyme Rubisco in tobacco chloroplasts

Benedict M. Long, Wei Yih Hee, Robert E. Sharwood, Benjamin D. Rae, Sarah Kaines, Yi-Leen Lim, Nghiem D. Nguyen, Baxter Massey, Soumi Bala, Susanne von Caemmerer, Murray R. Badger, & G. Dean Price
Nature Communications
2018, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-06044-0
Figure from paper

Overexpressing the H‐protein of the glycine cleavage system increases biomass yield in glasshouse and field grown transgenic tobacco plants

Patricia E. Lopez‐Calcagno, Stuart Fisk, Kenny L. Brown, Simon E. Bull, Paul F. South, Christine A. Raines
Plant Biotechnology Journal
2018, DOI: 10.1111/pbi.12953